Which is the best version of Street Fighter 2?

Which is the best version of Street Fighter 2?

Without Capcom Street Fighter 2, fighting games as a whole would not be the same as today. They might not even have caught on as a genre, and certainly wouldn’t have turned tournaments like Evo into major TV events worthy of developer announcements and big prize money.


Related: The Impact of Street Fighter 2

Capcom just didn’t know when to stop the cash cow. They made four more official arcade updates within three years of the release of the original, as well as several ports on the SNES, Genesis, Playstation, Sega Saturn, and more. There are so many that it can be difficult to tell each version of Street Fighter 2 from each other, let alone decide which of them is the best.

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10/10 Rainbow Edition and other pirate games

SF2 versions ranked - Rainbow Edition

Obviously, these are going to be at the bottom of the totem pole. They’re crappy versions of the real deal, either made for 8-bit machines or ROM hacked into oblivion. The Rainbow Edition however, is notorious for a reason. Named after its rainbow pattern logo, the game messed up the characters’ movements to ridiculous degrees.

Ryu’s Hurricane Kick moves across the screen at lightning speed. Guile can throw multiple Sonic Booms in a row and in the air. In addition, players can automatically change their characters mid-match by pressing the Start button. It also increases the game’s speed, something Capcom kept in mind when they made their next one SF2 port.

9/10 Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo Revival

SF2 Versions Ranked - Turbo Revival

This listing may be low, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t respectable. Turbo Revival is not just a port. It is a remake designed specifically for the Game Boy Advance. The music was remixed, and many of the scenes were changed to scenes from other games, such as Ryu moving from his SF2 castle to his Third strike one.

Akuma can also be selected, complete with Raging Demon super. The game also features new moody artwork that is still quite impressive today. Still, it’s not quite the same as usual Super Turbo. Commands were simplified for the GBA’s limited buttons, and it has curious additions like Air Combos and Alpha 3– juggles

8/10 Street Fighter 2: The World Warrior

SF2 versions ranked - World Warrior

The original Street Fighter 2 was a revolution in 1991, but not so much 30+ years later. The character art and animations are quite difficult compared to the updates (bad Eliza in Ken’s ending). Players also can’t have mirror matches, and it was also quite buggy, with bugs like “Guile’s Handcuffs” becoming legendary over the years.

Related: Street Fighter 2 turns 30: Cool things you didn’t know about the original game

In addition, only 8 of the 12 characters are playable. The four bosses Balrog, Vega, Sagat and M.Bison are CPU only. It is possible to play as them via hacking, but they are prone to eavesdropping or crashing the game entirely. If only there was another version of the SF2 which had them available as standard.

7/10 Street Fighter 2: Championship Edition

SF2 versions ranked - Champion Edition

If older fans don’t remember Orange-Dress Chun Li or Derpy Ryu & Ken, chances are they played Championship Edition. It has better artwork and more refined animations and makes the four bosses playable. Now players can finally figure out what to do with Balrog or Bison without hacking the game.

It also made mirror matches possible by introducing different colors for characters. So players can all choose their favorites without any arguments. Still, it may have annoyed SNES owners who got it World Wars port just to miss CEtheir upgrades. Luckily they got another port to make up for it.

6/10 Super Street Fighter 2: The New Challengers

SF2 Versions Ranked - New Challengers

Capcom decided to show off their new CPS2 arcade board by making this entry. The technology would become the basis for more famous fighting games, as a whole Street Fighter Alpha the series, the Darkstalkers games, and Marvel play up to the first one Marvel vs. Capcom. still, Super Street Fighter 2 was a bit of a disappointment upon release in 1993.

Sure, it had remixed music, new scenes for the reimagined classics, and four new characters, including fan favorite Cammy. However, after Hyper Fighting speed up the action, SSF2 slowed down again to CE levels. Capcom just wasn’t sure if speed was the way to go, making it an option in future ports and games before keeping the action fast.

5/10 Street Fighter 2 Turbo: Hyper Fighting

SF2 versions ranked - Hyper Fighting

After Rainbow Edition introduced speed, Capcom followed suit Hyper Fighting. The game was much faster than CE, plays at a tempo more familiar to modern battlers. It also offered even more costume colors for characters and added new moves. Chun Li got her Kikōken fireball for the first time and Ryu & Ken could do their Hurricane Kicks in the air.

Related: Street Fighter: Most Satisfying Victory Animations

The game was ported to the SNES and Genesis as SF2 Turbo and SF2: Special Champion Editionalthough they would soon be followed by ports in the Super SF2. If fatigue over the various releases hadn’t set in earlier, these home versions certainly would have. Capcom wanted two more in them too, including one so nice it was remade twice.

4/10 Ultra Street Fighter 2: The Final Challengers

SF2 versions rated- Ultra SF2

Made to celebrate Street Fighter the series’ 30th anniversary, Ultra SF2 was a Nintendo Switch exclusive; at least for now. It’s actually another port Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo with a few adjustments. Players can switch between the classic graphics or HD Remixits new sprites and widescreen aspect ratio.

The roster also received two new additions: Evil Ryu and Violent Ken, expanding the definition of “new character.” The game also has a 2v1 dramatic mode, and a first person mode called ‘Way of the Hadō’ which doesn’t really work. It is a more attractive deal now than at launch. Back then, it cost $40, which was quite exorbitant.

3/10 Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo: HD Remix

SF2 Versions Rated - HD Remix

Especially when its predecessor had been out on PS3 and Xbox 360 since 2008. It only offered the redrawn graphics, didn’t have the extra modes, and only cost $14.99 at launch. Knowing that is not strange Ultra SF2 annoyed people. Was ‘Way of the Hadō’ worth the extra $25? Not that HD Remix was also warmly received upon release.

The new sprites revealed the original Super Turboits limited animation, and the new artwork looked worse than Turbo Revival‘s moody shadow pieces. At least the music was nice, even though it was all taken from the Overclocked Remix website. Super Turbo HD is a nice enough game, and better than most. It should have just been it’s own thing instead of being an HD paint job on 1994 sprites.

2/10 Hyper Street Fighter 2: The Anniversary Edition

SF2 versions ranked - Hyper SF2

Created for the franchise’s 15th anniversary, Hyper Street Fighter 2 is not just another Super Turbo port. In a quirky move, it gave players the chance to test each version of each character against each other. They had tested the waters with it before, with Alpha 3 use X-Ism to replicate Super Turboand a classic mode to replicate CEits balance.

On paper, the sooner Super Turbo characters would wipe the floor with World Wars cast. However World Wars characters dealt more damage with each attack. Each version has its own quirks and unique features. It became a fascinating game and one that is now available on modern machines through Capcom Fighting Collection.

1/10 Super Street Fighter 2 Turbo

SF2 versions rated - Super Turbo

When it comes to Super Turbo, accept no substitutes. Sure, the CPU is very hard even on the lowest difficulty, it’s in 4:3, and the debut super boss Akuma is really crushing to fight (and very picky to choose). Still, it’s still more comfortable to play in its original 1994 form, and easier on the eyes too. Even if it was just Super SF2 with speed, a secret boss and the new Super Combo mechanic.

Once the meter was full, characters could perform one large, high-damage move. It took that The art of fighting the series introduced and refined it into something more balanced and fun to do. Despite HD coat of paint or Ultra SF2their additions, they could not improve on what Super Turbo already offered. Capcom took the hint at the time and moved on to Street Fighter Alpha in 1995. Nevertheless, they are unable to completely drop the series.

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